Quantity can ruin quality.

Daily writing doesn’t make it automatically good

I’m tired. While dreaming of creating articulated content, I am struggling to write little articles. I am so proud to have been writing for almost four months, every single day. But I miss going deeper. Admitting the defeat, from time to time, is part of the game. You say you don’t have anything to write about, and you say it in such an elaborated way that it becomes an article. A great excuse to write about not wanting to write. It’s a public way to foul yourself, You know it, and you know that everybody understands it, but you still look at the word counter, waiting for it to reach a decent number. What is it? 100 words? 200 words? What’s the bare minimum amount of words that makes you feel not ashamed? That is the problem with habits, with commitments. “I made it!”, “I wrote every day!”. “I am good!”. “I will conquer the World!”. But, let’s stop for a second, okay? I understand you’re busy, you’re not a professional writer, it’s already a great victory to devote from 15 to 30 minutes every day to write. And, fine, let’s admit it, you’re brave, you’re also publishing your efforts. But, let’s ask ourselves: what did you write? How much of your content is interesting, unique, engaging, stimulating? How much of your word flow is going to become “evergreen”? Who will remember any of what you wrote? And what will they remember? Yes, sure, you can say that your goal is to “build a habit,” and, look at this, you made it. Fine, but is the content worthwhile?

Quality comes with quantity, but don’t get numb and addicted to fulfilling your daily commitment superficially because “you have to do it.” On top of the continuity, you need to create valuable content. When is the right time to assess what you have written?

Quantity can ruin quality.
Quantity can ruin quality.
+2
Senior Experience Designer. 25 years designing, developing, writing, speaking, facilitating and teaching.

Leave a Reply