Don’t waste your time on tasks that software can do for you, automate repetitive tasks, and gain time to write (or to sleep if you want).

Automate repetitive tasks

Writing every day for 365 days, I’ve learned to save time by automating some processes.

Using keyboard macros, I was able to avoid typing many things again and again. To remove friction in initiating to write, I’ve found handy a macro to create a blank document with the right name in the right path, ready to use it.

Although it might seem stupid, it removes completely the effort to open deeply nested folders, find the right place to start, and give a title with a date. It’s maybe 30 or 60 seconds of work that can determine your success in writing now or never. Even if there are a few steps in your process and seem simple and straightforward, it’s enough to kill your motivation to start. And then, after some hundreds of times that you repeat these automated shortcuts, they become second-nature. 

I’ve created a personal macro code. If I type “.new500” in any place, any context in which I am working, and I will get a newly created Google Doc, blank, ready for me in a new browser window, saved in the right folder. I just have to write.

Next time I have to write, I don’t have to anticipate the mental fatigue of even thinking about the sequence of steps to create a new document to write in my writing process.

Think about it, even if it’s ten steps per day, in one year, you can save a compounded amount of 3’650 steps.

Don’t waste your time on tasks that software can do for you, automate repetitive tasks, and gain time to write (or to sleep if you want).

Don’t waste your time on tasks that software can do for you, automate repetitive tasks, and gain time to write (or to sleep if you want).
Don’t waste your time on tasks that software can do for you, automate repetitive tasks, and gain time to write (or to sleep if you want).

This is Essay 18 of 30 in the my challenge One Year Writing: 30 Lessons Learned in 30 Days

  1. The Journey is the Purpose (16 Nov 2020)
  2. Writing is Thinking (17 Nov 2020)
  3. Write a Lot to Write Well (18 Nov 2020)
  4. Creative Loneliness (19 Nov 2020)
  5. Be Less Ambitious, Be More Consistent (20 Nov 2020)
  6. Writing builds your networks (21 Nov 2020)
  7. Connect ideas now (22 Nov 2020)
  8. Writing improves your memory (23 Nov 2020)
  9. Writing makes you a better observer (24 Nov 2020)
  10. Writing sets the focus on yourself (25 Nov 2020)
  11. Dissolve your distractions (26 Nov 2020)
  12. Writing reduces your jargon and slang (27 Nov 2020)
  13. Walking generates ideas (28 Nov 2020)
  14. Writing is like drinking coffee (29 Nov 2020)
  15. Creativity makes you happy (30 Nov 2020)
  16. Be smart, let it go (1 Dec 2020)
  17. Writing is a process (2 Dec 2020)
  18. Automate repetitive tasks (3 Dec 2020)
  19. Publish text as digital text, not images (4 Dec 2020)
  20. Why asking questions? (5 Dec 2020)
  21. Facilitate growth by tracking habits (6 Dec 2020)
  22. Type more, type faster, type better (7 Dec 2020)
  23. Transcribe your thoughts to become an effective communicator (8 Dec 2020)
  24. Write daily to become a better manager (9 Dec 2020)
  25. Do it small to do it better (10 Dec 2020)
  26. Don’t lose your mind. Back it up (11 Dec 2020)
  27. Write daily to enhance your reality (12 Dec 2020)
  28. If only I could be ten, again (13 Dec 2020)
  29. Writing compounds despite everything (14 Dec 2020)
  30. The habit of building habits (15 Dec 2020)

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Senior Experience Designer. 25 years designing, developing, writing, speaking, facilitating and teaching.

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